Friday, September 14, 2012

Power of Pink Car Wash Don't Forget! September 29th



Please come out and join us on September 29, 2012 as we continue the fight against Breast Cancer with our third annual 'Power of Pink' car wash. This year it will be held at the Water Works Car Wash at 5604 Talbot Place, Catonsville, MD 21207. This is the car wash right across from Mr. G's by Route 40 and Johnnycake Road. We will be there from 12pm to 6pm washing cars for this great cause.

Motorcycle washes will be $5
Car Washes are $7
Truck Washes are $10

Thursday, September 13, 2012

National Ovarian Cancer Coalition Run/Walk



The National Ovarian Cancer Coalition is gearing up for its 3rd annual Run/Walk on September 30th. If you're in the Annapolis area you definitely should take a look into this and support yet another great cause.

Register here:

And Go to this link here for more info about the group and this event.









Join the Central Maryland Chapter of the National Ovarian Cancer Coalition for its 3rd Annual Run/Walk to Break the Silence on Ovarian Cancer which will be held on Sunday, September 30, 2012, at Westfield Annapolis in Annapolis, MD. There will be a 5K Run and a 3K Walk at this event.
We are so excited about the NEW LOCATION. The race will take place early and will be wrapping up before the mall stores open. Westfield Annapolis is happy to have us and has been wonderful in accommodating our needs!

Westfield Annapolis
2002 Annapolis Mall
Annapolis, MD 21401

For more information, contact the chapter at 443-433-2597 or CentralMD@ovarian.org
To view photos from last year's event, visit: majornocc.shutterfly.com/pictures/155

Tuesday, September 11, 2012

No Kid Hungry

The Pink Pineapple's primary focus may be breast cancer and breast caner awareness, but that doesn't mean we aren't keeping our eyes on the myriad of other social issues out there. While Childhood obesity is a big issue in our country today, somehow, there are still those who do not have enough to eat. With that said, The Food Network's No Kid Hungry campaign launches on September 15th.

You can go to their website by clicking here to get more information, donate directly, or find restaurants that are participating in the fund raising efforts.


Friday, September 7, 2012

Stand Up To Cancer Webcast

Over on Yahoo TV , they will be showing Stand Up To Cancer tonight. It will also be available on network TV. Here is the information, according to the web site.



The telethon will include performances by Taylor Swift, Alicia Keys, Coldplay, and Tim McGraw, and feature appearances by Gwyneth Paltrow, Matt Damon, Jessica Biel, Julia Roberts, Jeremy Renner, Minka Kelly, Joe Manganiello, and many more to raise funds for innovative research to develop new treatments quickly in order to save lives.

This nationally televised fundraising event will air commercial–free at 8 PM on all the major networks (ABC, FOX, NBC and CBS) as well as cable networks (BIO, E!, ENCORE, HBO, HBO Latino, ION Television, Lifetime Movie Network, Logo, MLB Network, mun2, Palladia, SHOWTIME, Smithsonian Channel, STARZ, STYLE, TBS and VH1), and, of course, on Yahoo! TV. 


Update: Here is the Stand Up 2 Cancer website if you wish to donate

Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Kellie Pickler shaves her head for Breast Cancer

Here is a celebrity who is taking up the fight against Breast Cancer. E Online posted the story today.



Kellie Pickler
Courtesy Russ Harrington


Kellie Pickler appeared on Good Morning America today and, in a touching show of bravery and solidarity with her best friend, a breast cancer survivor, buzzed her long blond locks clean off.

"Cancer does not discriminate," Pickler said.

"If this compels even one person to change their mentality toward waiting until the age of 40 for their mammogram, then it will be worth it," Miller, who underwent a double mastectomy and begins chemotherapy this week, said.

Power of Pink Car Wash September 29



Please come out and join us on September 29, 2012 as we continue the fight against Breast Cancer with our third annual 'Power of Pink' car wash. This year it will be held at the Water Works Car Wash at 5604 Talbot Place, Catonsville, MD 21207. This is the car wash right across from Mr. G's by Route 40 and Johnnycake Road. We will be there from 12pm to 6pm washing cars for this great cause.

Motorcycle washes will be $5
Car Washes are $7
Truck Washes are $10

Men and Breast Cancer

Male Breast Cancer - courtesy of the breast Cancer Charities of America

The Basics
Male breast cancer is a rare cancer that forms in the breast tissue of men. It accounts for less than one-percent of all breast cancer diagnoses.  Though breast cancer is most commonly thought of as a woman’s disease, it indeed can and does occur in men.
Male breast cancer is more commonly found in older men, typically between the ages of 60 and 70 but can occur at any age.
Men diagnosed with male breast cancer at an early stage have a good chance for a cure. However, many men delay seeing their doctors if they notice unusual signs or symptoms, such as a breast lump. For this reason, many male breast cancers tend to be diagnosed when the disease is more advanced.

Know the Symptoms
Signs and symptoms of male breast cancer can include:
  • A painless lump or thickening in your breast tissue
  • Changes to the skin covering your breast, such as dimpling, puckering, redness or scaling
  • Changes to your nipple, such as redness or scaling, or a nipple that begins to turn inward
  • Discharge from your nipple
If you have any of these symptoms, see a doctor immediately.  Do not delay!
Understand the Causes
It is not completely clear what causes male breast cancer.  We know that male breast cancer occurs when some breast cells begin growing abnormally. These cells divide more rapidly than healthy cells do. The accumulating cells form a tumor that may spread (metastasize) to nearby tissue, to the lymph nodes or to other parts of the body.
Where breast cancer begins in men
Everyone is born with a small amount of breast tissue. Breast tissue is made up of milk-producing glands (lobules), ducts that carry milk to the nipples and fat. Women begin developing more breast tissue during puberty and men do not. Because men are born with a small amount of breast tissue, they can develop breast cancer.
Types of breast cancer diagnosed in men include:
  • Cancer that begins in the milk ducts. Ductal carcinoma is the most common type of male breast cancer. Nearly all male breast cancers begin in the milk ducts.
  • Cancer that begins in the milk-producing glands. Lobular carcinoma is rare in men because men have few lobules in their breast tissue.
  • Cancer that spreads to the nipple. In some cases, breast cancer can form in the milk ducts and spread to the nipple, causing crusty, scaly skin around the nipple. This is called Paget’s disease of the nipple.
In addition, some men inherit mutated genes from their parents that increase the risk of breast cancer. Mutations in one of several genes, especially a gene called BRCA2, put you at greater risk of developing breast and prostate cancers. The normal function of these genes is to help prevent cancer by making proteins that keep cells from growing abnormally. But if they have a mutation, the genes aren’t as effective at protecting you from cancer.
Meeting with a genetic counselor and undergoing genetic testing may determine whether you carry gene mutations that increase your risk of breast cancer. Discuss the benefits and risks of genetic testing with your doctor.

Know the Risk Factors
Factors that increase the risk of male breast cancer include:
  • Older age. Breast cancer is most common in men ages 60 to 70.
  • Exposure to estrogen. If you take estrogen-related drugs, such as those used as part of a sex-change procedure, your risk of breast cancer is increased. Estrogen drugs may also be used in hormone therapy for prostate cancer.
  • Family history of breast cancer. If you have a close family member with breast cancer, you have a greater chance of developing the disease.
  • Klinefelter’s syndrome. This genetic syndrome occurs when a boy is born with more than one copy of the X chromosome. Klinefelter’s syndrome causes abnormal development of the testicles. As a result, men with this syndrome produce lower levels of certain male hormones (androgens) and more female hormones (estrogens).
  • Liver disease. If you have liver disease, such as cirrhosis of the liver, your male hormones may be reduced and your female hormones may be increased. This can increase your risk of breast cancer.
  • Obesity. Obesity may be a risk factor for breast cancer in men because it increases the number of fat cells in the body. Fat cells convert androgens into estrogen, which may increase the amount of estrogen in your body and, therefore, your risk of breast cancer.
  • Radiation exposure. If you’ve received radiation treatments to your chest, such as those used to treat cancers in the chest, you’re more likely to develop breast cancer later in life.

Monday, September 3, 2012

Understanding Breast Cancer

Courtesy of The Breast Cancer Charities of America


Did you know…
  • 1 in 8 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer
  • A healthy diet & exercise routine can reduce your chance for breast cancer by nearly 40%
  • When caught early, breast cancer has a 98% survival rate
  • Nearly 85% of women diagnosed with breast cancer DO NOT have a family history
  • Over 2 Million women in the US have been diagnosed and treated for breast cancer
Knowing Your Body:
For women under 50-years old:
  • Employ annual clinical breast examinations and monthly breast self-examinations as your primary early detection protocol.
  • Once a year, every year, without fail, schedule an appointment with your healthcare provider to perform a clinical breast examination. We recommend you schedule it on or near your birthday.
  • Once a month, every month, without fail, set aside 15 minutes to conduct thorough breast self-examination. We recommend you schedule it on the first day of menstruation.
  • Schedule a mammogram only if needed for diagnosis of a suspected lump. Even then, be sure to schedule that mammogram within the first 14 days of your menstrual cycle.
  • In addition, you may wish to employ annual thermography screening between the ages of 30 and 50.
  • If you are between the ages of 20 and 30, consider a thermogram every two years in addition to your monthly breast self-examinations.
For women over 50-years old:
  • Employ annual clinical breast examinations and monthly breast self-examinations as your primary early detection protocol.
  • Once a year, every year, without fail, schedule an appointment with your healthcare provider to perform a clinical breast examination. We recommend you schedule it on or near your birthday.
  • Once a month, every month, without fail, set aside 15 minutes to conduct a thorough breast self-examination. We recommend you schedule it on the first day of your period if you are still menstruating.
  • Schedule a mammogram if you discover a lump. Even then, be sure to schedule that mammogram within the first 14 days of your menstrual cycle if you are still menstruating.
  • Employ mammography screening every other year.
  • Consider thermography screening on alternate years.
  • If a positive result comes back from the thermogram, schedule a mammogram.
Steps to help you respond with maximum intelligence to this diagnosis and help you rebuild your self-healing functions.
The basic action points are:
  1. Examine. Step back from the day-to-day pressures of your life to evaluate your current situation in its entirety.
  2. Discover. Assess both current life issues that must be changed as well as future needs that must be met.
  3. Plan. Create a simple plan to restore health and total well-being.
  4. Implement. Work in partnership with health advisors who have your confidence. Begin a self-care plan to create whole-person well-being.
  5. Review. Conduct quarterly reviews of your progress, making adjustments as necessary.
Taken together, these action points will play the central role in mobilizing all your healing options and capacities, both external and internal.
The Breast Cancer Prevention Lifestyle
Yes, you can maximize your potential for actually preventing breast cancer! It’s all about personal choices in how we take care of ourselves. And here’s the roadmap:
Let’s talk nutrition! Making wise nutritional choices is one of the best defenses against breast cancer. Put these tips to work in your own life:
  • Eat a plant! At least two-thirds of your plate should be fresh vegetables and whole grains. No more than one-third should be animal protein.
  • Start your day with whole grain cereals. They contain folates, a B vitamin, which may help prevent breast cancer. Top with melons and strawberries, which are also rich in folates.
  • Add asparagus, beans, and even sun_ower seeds to your lunch salad of leafy greens including spinach and romaine. You’ll get even more folate.
  • Think tomatoes. It’s the lycopene which studies link to a reduction in several cancers including cancers of the breast.
  • Go green—tea that is. Several studies show regular green tea consumption has slowed or even prevented the development of breast cancer.
  • Limit or eliminate alcohol. Even one glass of wine a day has been linked to higher breast cancer risk.
  • Cook wisely. Stew, braise or steam rather than fry, grill or broil. High temperatures may cause cancer causing chemicals to form that may increase cancer risk.